Holly’s Video Tour through Triton Museum solo show

Come take a tour through my solo exhibition at the Triton Museum of Art! Learn the stories behind a few key paintings, and see the exhibition installed in the Triton’s Rotunda Gallery.

Van Hart’s hard-won painterly skills are undeniable and compelling. Her naturalistic yet symbolic paintings . . . present their enigmatic subjects with both beauty and conviction, memorably.” – DeWitt Cheng, Art writer for Art Ltd, Artillery, ARTnews, and Visual Art Source

[Top 50 Questions] How does living in Silicon Valley impact your art?

In “Top Fifty Questions”, I’ll answer the top things I’m asked as an artist. (These questions are usually raised at cocktail parties and other fun social events.)

Silicon Valley, in northern California, is a hotbed of technology innovation. It is a place where anything is possible, and failures are just stepping stones to the next success.

I love this part of the culture, which played out in my life every day for 20 years as a Silicon Valley-based high tech exec, and now in my art.  My whole ‘Possibilities’ series is rooted in the unrelenting optimism of Silicon Valley.

You can read more about my Silicon Valley experience here on LinkedIn.

Not everyone loves Silicon Valley as much as I do. Have you lived or worked here?  What’s your take?

 

Click here to see the rest of the Top 50 Questions

‘Flourishing’

oil painting by Holly Van Hart

Flourishing
40 x 30 inches
Oil, acrylic, silica sand, and silicon wafers on canvas
$2,900
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Flourishing (detail, showing sand in oil paints)

Flourishing (detail, showing silica sand in oil paints)

Flourishing (detail, showing silicon wafers in oil paints)

Flourishing (detail, showing silicon wafers in oil paints)

Ever see a painting that included unusual textures and objects (rope, a child’s math homework, dried flowers, hex nuts) and wonder why? Why on earth did the artist use that stuff?

For example, why would an artist (in this case me) put silicon wafers and silica sand in an oil painting? Great question. Silicon wafers and silica sand were chosen for ‘Flourishing’ for their meaning, and for their visual interest.

Silicon wafers and silica sand represent full-tilt, no-holds-barred, human creativity – creativity in its most universal sense, and also as related to the technology innovation happening in Silicon Valley.

These textures also represent the ‘former’ me – who enjoyed 20 years in the computer and networking industry – and the ‘current me’ – who loves living and working as a full-time artist in Silicon Valley.

To see more paintings and textures in this ‘Alive with Possibilities’ series, click here.

To see a different sort of texture, as used in my ‘Possibilities Abound’ series, click here.

 

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Free! e-Catalog of Holly Van Hart’s art

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[Top 50 Questions] How much time does it take to complete a painting?

In “Top Fifty Questions”, I’ll answer the top questions I’m asked as an artist. (These questions are usually asked at cocktail parties and other fun social events.)

How much time does it take to complete a painting?

For me, it takes 4-6 months from start to finish (elapsed time) to complete an oil painting.  This is mostly because I paint in layers.  Each painting has five to ten layers of paint, and each layer takes a week or so to dry.

Plus I need extra time at the end to reflect on the (almost) finished work and make any last improvements. Sometimes what seems like a minor improvement will make me soooo much happier with the end result.

The actual working time on any one painting is typically 60 – 120 hours. And sometimes more. It varies greatly by subject matter, size, and style. It also varies by how much I’m stretching myself into new territory; the more experimental, the longer it takes.

 

Click here to see the rest of the Top 50 Questions

 

New Book! Top Paintings paired with Favorite Inspirational Quotes.

Click here to preview and download (free!)

Consumer’s Guide to Original Art

Whether you own 100 pieces of art or are looking for your first one, this book gives you the info you need to shop confidently (and have loads of fun!). Includes 5 things you must do when collecting original art, and 3 things to avoid.

Free instant download. No signup required.

 
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